Installation of tidal turbine moves closer

Western Telegraph: The DeltaStream device designed by Pembrokeshire engineer Richard Ayre. The DeltaStream device designed by Pembrokeshire engineer Richard Ayre.

THE installation of Wales’ first full-scale tidal turbine off the Pembrokeshire coast has moved a step closer.

The company behind it, Tidal Energy Limited (TEL), has handed out the last of its supply contracts, taking the number of businesses involved in the project to 21.

Its DeltaStream prototype is due to undergo harbour trials in Milford Haven later this year, before it is deployed on Ramsey Sound’s sea bed in 2014.

Here, it will generate clean electricity for the homes of St Davids over its 12-month demonstration period.

Invented by Pembrokeshire engineer Richard Ayre, the device sits on the seabed under its own gravity and comprises of three independent 400kW turbines mounted on a triangular frame.
TEL has awarded one of its final contracts to Mustang Marine, a Pembrokeshire boat-building company. It will construct the DeltaStream device at its Pembroke Port headquarters.

The company’s Managing Director, Kevin Lewis said: “We are delighted to be involved with TEL for the project. As marine engineers we have extensive experience in building structures and commercial vessels for the offshore wind farm market as well as work boats, pilot boats and passenger vessels.

“Tidal energy is a new area for us and we are very much looking forward to being a part of the team.”

Other companies involved in the project are industry leaders Siemans (gear hub), GE Energy (electrical power system) and Designcraft (rotor production).

TEL’s Managing Director Martin Murphy said: “Throughout the process we have focussed on managing the risk that is inherent in projects operating in the extremely challenging and hostile sub-sea environment.

“By appointing industry leading companies which have already built up considerable experience within the marine energy industry and have proven technologies, we have mitigated that risk as far as possible.”

Wales’ Economy minister Edwina Hart added: “Developing a marine renewable industry in Wales offers real opportunities for growth and jobs, particularly through supply chains. Helping to put Wales at the forefront of marine energy development, the Welsh Government has worked closely with the company, providing support through £8m of EU structural funds and in ensuring Welsh businesses are in a position to participate in, and benefit from this emerging sector in Wales."

Comments (2)

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11:08pm Wed 10 Jul 13

kvakernaak says...

Great news! The development of ocean energy will make the UK, Netherlands and other coastal states less dependent on foreign oil. (By the way, here's a recent review of tidal and wave energy projects and research going on right now http://dailyfusion.n
et/2013/07/new-wave-
and-tidal-energy-tec
hnologies-review-135
73/ ). But with this technology people need to be careful too. Because we still do not know how the large marine energy infrastructure will impact on the ocean ecosystem and even the climate. But we need to be careful with this technology, too. We still don't know how it will affect the marine ecosystem or perhaps even the climate.
Great news! The development of ocean energy will make the UK, Netherlands and other coastal states less dependent on foreign oil. (By the way, here's a recent review of tidal and wave energy projects and research going on right now http://dailyfusion.n et/2013/07/new-wave- and-tidal-energy-tec hnologies-review-135 73/ ). But with this technology people need to be careful too. Because we still do not know how the large marine energy infrastructure will impact on the ocean ecosystem and even the climate. But we need to be careful with this technology, too. We still don't know how it will affect the marine ecosystem or perhaps even the climate. kvakernaak
  • Score: 0

9:22am Fri 12 Jul 13

Tttoommy says...

Let's not bother with alleged "green" power, just build a few nuclear power stations on Anglesey for instance would help.
Governments are scared of the cost and the bad publicity from the green eco-terrorists so they're putting off decisions that have to be made re power generation in the next few decades, after all loads of power stations are coming to the end of their lives, green power is mostly only produced when it's sunny or windy (but not too windy of course)
Anyway If we're all forced into electric cars we'll need even more power generation or be faced with regular power cuts
Let's not bother with alleged "green" power, just build a few nuclear power stations on Anglesey for instance would help. Governments are scared of the cost and the bad publicity from the green eco-terrorists so they're putting off decisions that have to be made re power generation in the next few decades, after all loads of power stations are coming to the end of their lives, green power is mostly only produced when it's sunny or windy (but not too windy of course) Anyway If we're all forced into electric cars we'll need even more power generation or be faced with regular power cuts Tttoommy
  • Score: 0

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