Newgale problems likely to continue for some time yet, says county council

Western Telegraph: Newgale has had to undergo several clean-ups over recent months following storms and high tides. PICTURE: Western Telegraph. Newgale has had to undergo several clean-ups over recent months following storms and high tides. PICTURE: Western Telegraph.

Storm-battered Newgale is likely to continue to suffer for some time yet, the county council has warned.

The recent severe storms have resulted in major changes to the beach and shingle bank at Newgale.

It is estimated that the beach has lost over a metre’s depth of sand this winter.

As a result, the county council is advising people that until the natural environment has been given time to heal, it is likely that motorists, local residents and businesses will continue to be affected.

County council engineers are working closely with officers from Natural Resources Wales to try and improve the situation but warn there is no easy solution because of the pressure of natural forces on this part of the coastline and on the shingle bank in particular.

The council is not directly responsible for the shingle bank but is responsible for maintaining the road.

Councillor Rob Lewis, Cabinet Member for Highways and Transportation praised the hard work and effort of council staff in attempting to keep the Newgale road open throughout the recent bad weather.

He also expressed sympathy to local people and businesses, who had been affected by the problem.

“Due to repeated storm action over a prolonged period - which often coincided with high tides - the beach and shingle at Newgale has not had the opportunity to naturally recuperate,” he said.

“While this has meant that the ancient forest has been exposed to view, it also means that larger waves are now travelling much higher up the beach at times of high tide and breaking with greater force on the shingle bank at the back.”

He said that in addition to the loss of sand on the beach, the shingle bank itself had also lost a lot of its stones together with the fine sand and small pebbles that helped bind it together.

“It is now a much less substantive feature as well as being a great deal weaker than it was prior to the storms, as a result of which its defensive capabilities are considerably eroded,” he said.

“This, combined with the greater poundings by the larger waves that it is now exposed to at high tide is resulting in water coming over the top and through the shingle on a regular basis.

“This poses a risk to motorists as well as depositing large quantities of pebbles across the area to the rear of the beach, including across the road.”

Councillor Lewis said unfortunately until the sand levels were naturally re-established, more problems were inevitable and it would be likely that further road closures and clear up work would be necessary for the foreseeable future around periods of spring high tides.

He added that in future a planned approach to the highway and transport infrastructure would be needed based on the principles developed in the Shoreline Management Plan for the coastline.

Comments (5)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

7:49am Wed 5 Mar 14

bigglesr says...

The most logical approach would be to get on with re-routing the road away from the problem, rather than hoping that the weather will be kinder or for the beach to recover. I know that's likely to upset some local people, especially the existing businesses, but surely doing something practical is better than trusting to luck and having the heartbreak when that luck runs out.

In the interim, it would be helpful if there were warning signs in Haverfordwest when the road is closed, so that one could choose a better alternative route - the existing diversion has some very narrow sections unsuitable for lorries and buses, and gets very muddy especially as it's mostly used in the case of bad weather when people are diverted.
The most logical approach would be to get on with re-routing the road away from the problem, rather than hoping that the weather will be kinder or for the beach to recover. I know that's likely to upset some local people, especially the existing businesses, but surely doing something practical is better than trusting to luck and having the heartbreak when that luck runs out. In the interim, it would be helpful if there were warning signs in Haverfordwest when the road is closed, so that one could choose a better alternative route - the existing diversion has some very narrow sections unsuitable for lorries and buses, and gets very muddy especially as it's mostly used in the case of bad weather when people are diverted. bigglesr
  • Score: 8

9:25am Wed 5 Mar 14

teifion says...

Would be sensible for the Duke of Edinburgh to be given compensation and as biggle says give up a losing battle with the sea - my concern is who will fund the building of the new road - around LLandeilo.LLandovery towards LLanwrtyd wells the verges have started to slip on main trunk roads - A40 and A483 so the Senedds solution is to have single line traffic controlled by traffic lights (look for the signs - lane closed for your safety) the "roadworks" have been there 2 years and when I contacted the senedd I was told that possibly money MIGHT be found in the next few years to repair the roads
This was before the floods so be prepared for a VERY long wait
PS Welcome to the 18th century - where the rich get richer, they were never arrested found guilty and the "little man" suffered - no comparisons with the state of Wales or Pembs CC today - is there? ;(
Would be sensible for the Duke of Edinburgh to be given compensation and as biggle says give up a losing battle with the sea - my concern is who will fund the building of the new road - around LLandeilo.LLandovery towards LLanwrtyd wells the verges have started to slip on main trunk roads - A40 and A483 so the Senedds solution is to have single line traffic controlled by traffic lights (look for the signs - lane closed for your safety) the "roadworks" have been there 2 years and when I contacted the senedd I was told that possibly money MIGHT be found in the next few years to repair the roads This was before the floods so be prepared for a VERY long wait PS Welcome to the 18th century - where the rich get richer, they were never arrested found guilty and the "little man" suffered - no comparisons with the state of Wales or Pembs CC today - is there? ;( teifion
  • Score: 2

6:52pm Wed 5 Mar 14

William 1 says...

bigglesr wrote:
The most logical approach would be to get on with re-routing the road away from the problem, rather than hoping that the weather will be kinder or for the beach to recover. I know that's likely to upset some local people, especially the existing businesses, but surely doing something practical is better than trusting to luck and having the heartbreak when that luck runs out.

In the interim, it would be helpful if there were warning signs in Haverfordwest when the road is closed, so that one could choose a better alternative route - the existing diversion has some very narrow sections unsuitable for lorries and buses, and gets very muddy especially as it's mostly used in the case of bad weather when people are diverted.
Quite agree! There is going to be a lot of money spent at Tiers Cross, Bulford Road to make a bypass for the sake of refinery traffic. I say stop that development and divert the money to re-routing the road at Newgale, as there are many more people and businesses affected!
[quote][p][bold]bigglesr[/bold] wrote: The most logical approach would be to get on with re-routing the road away from the problem, rather than hoping that the weather will be kinder or for the beach to recover. I know that's likely to upset some local people, especially the existing businesses, but surely doing something practical is better than trusting to luck and having the heartbreak when that luck runs out. In the interim, it would be helpful if there were warning signs in Haverfordwest when the road is closed, so that one could choose a better alternative route - the existing diversion has some very narrow sections unsuitable for lorries and buses, and gets very muddy especially as it's mostly used in the case of bad weather when people are diverted.[/p][/quote]Quite agree! There is going to be a lot of money spent at Tiers Cross, Bulford Road to make a bypass for the sake of refinery traffic. I say stop that development and divert the money to re-routing the road at Newgale, as there are many more people and businesses affected! William 1
  • Score: 3

10:41pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Tttoommy says...

William 1 wrote:
bigglesr wrote:
The most logical approach would be to get on with re-routing the road away from the problem, rather than hoping that the weather will be kinder or for the beach to recover. I know that's likely to upset some local people, especially the existing businesses, but surely doing something practical is better than trusting to luck and having the heartbreak when that luck runs out.

In the interim, it would be helpful if there were warning signs in Haverfordwest when the road is closed, so that one could choose a better alternative route - the existing diversion has some very narrow sections unsuitable for lorries and buses, and gets very muddy especially as it's mostly used in the case of bad weather when people are diverted.
Quite agree! There is going to be a lot of money spent at Tiers Cross, Bulford Road to make a bypass for the sake of refinery traffic. I say stop that development and divert the money to re-routing the road at Newgale, as there are many more people and businesses affected!
actually did anyone see the HUGE roadworks on the A4075 into Pembroke? bigger than some new motorways YET all they did ewas straighten a sharp bend , methinks someone is being taken for a ride - HUGE COST - little benefit
[quote][p][bold]William 1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bigglesr[/bold] wrote: The most logical approach would be to get on with re-routing the road away from the problem, rather than hoping that the weather will be kinder or for the beach to recover. I know that's likely to upset some local people, especially the existing businesses, but surely doing something practical is better than trusting to luck and having the heartbreak when that luck runs out. In the interim, it would be helpful if there were warning signs in Haverfordwest when the road is closed, so that one could choose a better alternative route - the existing diversion has some very narrow sections unsuitable for lorries and buses, and gets very muddy especially as it's mostly used in the case of bad weather when people are diverted.[/p][/quote]Quite agree! There is going to be a lot of money spent at Tiers Cross, Bulford Road to make a bypass for the sake of refinery traffic. I say stop that development and divert the money to re-routing the road at Newgale, as there are many more people and businesses affected![/p][/quote]actually did anyone see the HUGE roadworks on the A4075 into Pembroke? bigger than some new motorways YET all they did ewas straighten a sharp bend , methinks someone is being taken for a ride - HUGE COST - little benefit Tttoommy
  • Score: 1

12:47pm Thu 6 Mar 14

pembsgirl2014 says...

Just wanted to add that I complained about the state of the diversion road with potholes and the road disintegrating at the edges. Drove to work this morning to see they had made a poor attempt at patching the bad parts. Why then does Keeston have a brand new tarmac surface? Oh yes someone lives close by!!
Just wanted to add that I complained about the state of the diversion road with potholes and the road disintegrating at the edges. Drove to work this morning to see they had made a poor attempt at patching the bad parts. Why then does Keeston have a brand new tarmac surface? Oh yes someone lives close by!! pembsgirl2014
  • Score: 3

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree