Pressure on charities to provide household essentials

STRUGGLING: Families are finding it hard to afford essentials such as washing powder. PICTURE: Stock image.

STRUGGLING: Families are finding it hard to afford essentials such as washing powder. PICTURE: Stock image.

First published in News

A NEW survey suggests that many charities are having to hand out basic household essentials such as toilet rolls and shampoo to some of the most vulnerable in our community.

Research by In Kind Direct – a charity that re-distributes household goods to other good causes - has shown that over half of the charities in its network are giving out essential supplies to families struggling to afford them.

Pembrokeshire People First (PPF) joined the network in 2011 to receive goods to help in the running of its daily activities.

But, after seeing people in desperate need, they decided to expand their services to include supplying essential personal care products, with nappies, shampoo and laundry products among the items most needed.

Jen Greene, Volunteer Co-ordinator at PPF, said: “We work with people who have sometimes come out of abusive relationships. One lady who came to us took several attempts to leave her partner.

“Each time she arrived with us she had nothing with her but the clothes on her back. It was great to be able to supply her with the basics such as toothbrush, hair care products, deodorant and make up. Her words were ‘I've never had things like this that were just mine’.”

“Without In Kind Direct we would struggle to provide these essentials, which make such a big difference to the people we support.”

A spokesman for In Kind said: “Not being able to afford shampoo or nappies for their baby is a deprivation that the majority of the British public could not and would not ever want to imagine. For a substantial minority in the UK everyday however, this is sadly a reality, and why In Kind Direct, relies on critical support from some of the UK's largest personal care suppliers and brands. “

Comments (6)

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4:29pm Sat 26 Apr 14

Electra1 says...

Trouble is there are those people who will get things from places like that and then use the money they have saved to buy scratch cards, cooked all day breakfasts in cafe's etc. This makes the genuine needy look bad.
Trouble is there are those people who will get things from places like that and then use the money they have saved to buy scratch cards, cooked all day breakfasts in cafe's etc. This makes the genuine needy look bad. Electra1
  • Score: 3

5:54pm Sat 26 Apr 14

PembrokeshireMan says...

Electra1 wrote:
Trouble is there are those people who will get things from places like that and then use the money they have saved to buy scratch cards, cooked all day breakfasts in cafe's etc. This makes the genuine needy look bad.
Are these real people you've witnessed buying scratch cards and all-day breakfasts with the benefits they may or may not be entitled to or just ones you've read about in the Daily Mail?

Every business that has employees who claim tax credits is on "benefits" - the business is only able to exist because it is subsidized by the government (one in five of the UK workforce, 5 million people, receives in-work benefits) Or how about the farmers with their Common Agricultural Policy subsidies - benefits scroungers the lot of them.

Pull your head out of your backside and see who the real benefits scroungers are before you start demonising the real poor.
[quote][p][bold]Electra1[/bold] wrote: Trouble is there are those people who will get things from places like that and then use the money they have saved to buy scratch cards, cooked all day breakfasts in cafe's etc. This makes the genuine needy look bad.[/p][/quote]Are these real people you've witnessed buying scratch cards and all-day breakfasts with the benefits they may or may not be entitled to or just ones you've read about in the Daily Mail? Every business that has employees who claim tax credits is on "benefits" - the business is only able to exist because it is subsidized by the government (one in five of the UK workforce, 5 million people, receives in-work benefits) Or how about the farmers with their Common Agricultural Policy subsidies - benefits scroungers the lot of them. Pull your head out of your backside and see who the real benefits scroungers are before you start demonising the real poor. PembrokeshireMan
  • Score: 2

6:14pm Sat 26 Apr 14

Electra1 says...

PembrokeshireMan wrote:
Electra1 wrote:
Trouble is there are those people who will get things from places like that and then use the money they have saved to buy scratch cards, cooked all day breakfasts in cafe's etc. This makes the genuine needy look bad.
Are these real people you've witnessed buying scratch cards and all-day breakfasts with the benefits they may or may not be entitled to or just ones you've read about in the Daily Mail?

Every business that has employees who claim tax credits is on "benefits" - the business is only able to exist because it is subsidized by the government (one in five of the UK workforce, 5 million people, receives in-work benefits) Or how about the farmers with their Common Agricultural Policy subsidies - benefits scroungers the lot of them.

Pull your head out of your backside and see who the real benefits scroungers are before you start demonising the real poor.
I can quite assure you these are people I see every day apart from the weekends. I can even tell you the name of the place they eat in. No I am not demonising the poor far from it but there are people that are really poor who are being classed as scroungers because of those who pretend to be.

And no I am not Conservative or Lib Dem I am a member of the Labour Party and Unison.
[quote][p][bold]PembrokeshireMan[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Electra1[/bold] wrote: Trouble is there are those people who will get things from places like that and then use the money they have saved to buy scratch cards, cooked all day breakfasts in cafe's etc. This makes the genuine needy look bad.[/p][/quote]Are these real people you've witnessed buying scratch cards and all-day breakfasts with the benefits they may or may not be entitled to or just ones you've read about in the Daily Mail? Every business that has employees who claim tax credits is on "benefits" - the business is only able to exist because it is subsidized by the government (one in five of the UK workforce, 5 million people, receives in-work benefits) Or how about the farmers with their Common Agricultural Policy subsidies - benefits scroungers the lot of them. Pull your head out of your backside and see who the real benefits scroungers are before you start demonising the real poor.[/p][/quote]I can quite assure you these are people I see every day apart from the weekends. I can even tell you the name of the place they eat in. No I am not demonising the poor far from it but there are people that are really poor who are being classed as scroungers because of those who pretend to be. And no I am not Conservative or Lib Dem I am a member of the Labour Party and Unison. Electra1
  • Score: 2

6:40pm Sat 26 Apr 14

PembrokeshireMan says...

Electra1 wrote:
PembrokeshireMan wrote:
Electra1 wrote:
Trouble is there are those people who will get things from places like that and then use the money they have saved to buy scratch cards, cooked all day breakfasts in cafe's etc. This makes the genuine needy look bad.
Are these real people you've witnessed buying scratch cards and all-day breakfasts with the benefits they may or may not be entitled to or just ones you've read about in the Daily Mail?

Every business that has employees who claim tax credits is on "benefits" - the business is only able to exist because it is subsidized by the government (one in five of the UK workforce, 5 million people, receives in-work benefits) Or how about the farmers with their Common Agricultural Policy subsidies - benefits scroungers the lot of them.

Pull your head out of your backside and see who the real benefits scroungers are before you start demonising the real poor.
I can quite assure you these are people I see every day apart from the weekends. I can even tell you the name of the place they eat in. No I am not demonising the poor far from it but there are people that are really poor who are being classed as scroungers because of those who pretend to be.

And no I am not Conservative or Lib Dem I am a member of the Labour Party and Unison.
So the people who are not in work, for whatever reason, and are claiming benefits are not poor?

How poor do you have to be in your world to be classed as poor?

And do you begrudge them eating where they do because they do not work?

Maybe they should be in the work house, working for their keep.
[quote][p][bold]Electra1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]PembrokeshireMan[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Electra1[/bold] wrote: Trouble is there are those people who will get things from places like that and then use the money they have saved to buy scratch cards, cooked all day breakfasts in cafe's etc. This makes the genuine needy look bad.[/p][/quote]Are these real people you've witnessed buying scratch cards and all-day breakfasts with the benefits they may or may not be entitled to or just ones you've read about in the Daily Mail? Every business that has employees who claim tax credits is on "benefits" - the business is only able to exist because it is subsidized by the government (one in five of the UK workforce, 5 million people, receives in-work benefits) Or how about the farmers with their Common Agricultural Policy subsidies - benefits scroungers the lot of them. Pull your head out of your backside and see who the real benefits scroungers are before you start demonising the real poor.[/p][/quote]I can quite assure you these are people I see every day apart from the weekends. I can even tell you the name of the place they eat in. No I am not demonising the poor far from it but there are people that are really poor who are being classed as scroungers because of those who pretend to be. And no I am not Conservative or Lib Dem I am a member of the Labour Party and Unison.[/p][/quote]So the people who are not in work, for whatever reason, and are claiming benefits are not poor? How poor do you have to be in your world to be classed as poor? And do you begrudge them eating where they do because they do not work? Maybe they should be in the work house, working for their keep. PembrokeshireMan
  • Score: 3

6:50pm Sat 26 Apr 14

Electra1 says...

PembrokeshireMan wrote:
Electra1 wrote:
PembrokeshireMan wrote:
Electra1 wrote:
Trouble is there are those people who will get things from places like that and then use the money they have saved to buy scratch cards, cooked all day breakfasts in cafe's etc. This makes the genuine needy look bad.
Are these real people you've witnessed buying scratch cards and all-day breakfasts with the benefits they may or may not be entitled to or just ones you've read about in the Daily Mail?

Every business that has employees who claim tax credits is on "benefits" - the business is only able to exist because it is subsidized by the government (one in five of the UK workforce, 5 million people, receives in-work benefits) Or how about the farmers with their Common Agricultural Policy subsidies - benefits scroungers the lot of them.

Pull your head out of your backside and see who the real benefits scroungers are before you start demonising the real poor.
I can quite assure you these are people I see every day apart from the weekends. I can even tell you the name of the place they eat in. No I am not demonising the poor far from it but there are people that are really poor who are being classed as scroungers because of those who pretend to be.

And no I am not Conservative or Lib Dem I am a member of the Labour Party and Unison.
So the people who are not in work, for whatever reason, and are claiming benefits are not poor?

How poor do you have to be in your world to be classed as poor?

And do you begrudge them eating where they do because they do not work?

Maybe they should be in the work house, working for their keep.
I couldn't afford to spend £8.45p every day on a breakfast but then I am classed as OAP and money is tight.
[quote][p][bold]PembrokeshireMan[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Electra1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]PembrokeshireMan[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Electra1[/bold] wrote: Trouble is there are those people who will get things from places like that and then use the money they have saved to buy scratch cards, cooked all day breakfasts in cafe's etc. This makes the genuine needy look bad.[/p][/quote]Are these real people you've witnessed buying scratch cards and all-day breakfasts with the benefits they may or may not be entitled to or just ones you've read about in the Daily Mail? Every business that has employees who claim tax credits is on "benefits" - the business is only able to exist because it is subsidized by the government (one in five of the UK workforce, 5 million people, receives in-work benefits) Or how about the farmers with their Common Agricultural Policy subsidies - benefits scroungers the lot of them. Pull your head out of your backside and see who the real benefits scroungers are before you start demonising the real poor.[/p][/quote]I can quite assure you these are people I see every day apart from the weekends. I can even tell you the name of the place they eat in. No I am not demonising the poor far from it but there are people that are really poor who are being classed as scroungers because of those who pretend to be. And no I am not Conservative or Lib Dem I am a member of the Labour Party and Unison.[/p][/quote]So the people who are not in work, for whatever reason, and are claiming benefits are not poor? How poor do you have to be in your world to be classed as poor? And do you begrudge them eating where they do because they do not work? Maybe they should be in the work house, working for their keep.[/p][/quote]I couldn't afford to spend £8.45p every day on a breakfast but then I am classed as OAP and money is tight. Electra1
  • Score: 1

9:58pm Sat 26 Apr 14

Tttoommy says...

Maybe as Bryn that beloved civil SERVANT paysso little tax he could afford to hand over a few sanitary towels or bog rolls to the real needy
Maybe as Bryn that beloved civil SERVANT paysso little tax he could afford to hand over a few sanitary towels or bog rolls to the real needy Tttoommy
  • Score: 2

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