Disruption expected as county prepares for strike action

Western Telegraph: A previous public sector strike march through Haverfordwest. A previous public sector strike march through Haverfordwest.

WIDESPREAD disruption is expected on Thursday (July 10) as public sector workers strike over pay and conditions.

The strike - which will include members of the National Union of Teachers (NUT), the Public and Commercial Services (PCS) union, Fire Brigades Union (FBU), GMB, Unison and Unite - looks likely to be the second biggest ever.

About 17 Pembrokeshire primary schools will shut their doors for the day. Sixteen schools will be fully open while the remainder are likely to be partially open.

Five of the county’s secondary schools will definitely be open - Ysgol Bro Gwaun/Fishguard, Ysgol y Preseli, Sir Thomas Picton, Greenhill/Tenby and Pembroke.

Tasker Milward and Milford Haven are likely to be open while Ysgol Dewi Sant will be partially open.

Pembrokeshire County Council deputy leader Councillor Rob Lewis warned there would be disruption to other council services as well during the one-day strike.

“While we are committed to keeping essential services running as normally as possible, it is inevitable there will be some inconvenience to the public and we are asking people to be patient,” he said.

“This is a national dispute which is beyond the control of Pembrokeshire County Council.”

It is not known how badly the industrial action will affect refuse collections as support for the strike is unknown until the actual day.

The authority’s customer service centres are likely to be affected and residents are being asked to delay routine calls until the strike is over.

Leisure centres are expected to remain open as are libraries although users are being asked to check before visiting.

It will also be business as usual for both Scolton Manor and the Pembrokeshire Archive.

NUT Pembrokeshire branch secretary Anton Brcar said teachers were striking over fair funding, school banding, the number of exams and staffing levels.

“Striking is always the last resort,” he added.

UNISON said pay freezes and below-inflation pay rises had reduced local government workers’ pay by 20% since 2010.

The union’s Pembrokeshire branch secretary Vic Dennis said: “Most UNISON members in Pembrokeshire are low-paid, part-time women workers, struggling to pay their household bills. Losing pay for strike action is not something they do lightly.

“Our members are not asking for the 14% pay increase company bosses and bankers are getting. Or the 11% MPs will see. They are just asking for a rise of at least £1 an hour.”

For information about individual schools and other council services visit www.pembrokeshire.gov.uk. The council’s Facebook and Twitter pages will also have the latest updates.

Comments (2)

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2:27pm Tue 8 Jul 14

Tttoommy says...

It's amazing how when the poorest go on strike we really notice - when the richest disappear for weeks everything goes along as normal, some say better.

These are the guys whose salaries were being cut whilst Bryn in an "open meeting" behind security guards was advising councillors on his own pay rise which has now been deemed illegal

I know the LGA conference is on, somewhere on the South Coast of England - anyone know If Bryn and jamie (aka mini-me) have gone to it?

wonder If they'll put THAT on exps?
It's amazing how when the poorest go on strike we really notice - when the richest disappear for weeks everything goes along as normal, some say better. These are the guys whose salaries were being cut whilst Bryn in an "open meeting" behind security guards was advising councillors on his own pay rise which has now been deemed illegal I know the LGA conference is on, somewhere on the South Coast of England - anyone know If Bryn and jamie (aka mini-me) have gone to it? wonder If they'll put THAT on exps? Tttoommy
  • Score: 6

9:04pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Harrythecat says...

When schools are open and parents do not send their children, that is an unauthorised absence potentially attracting a fine. When the parents are willing to send them but the school is not able to have them, what is that classed as and who should get fined ? Who picks up the childcare costs
When schools are open and parents do not send their children, that is an unauthorised absence potentially attracting a fine. When the parents are willing to send them but the school is not able to have them, what is that classed as and who should get fined ? Who picks up the childcare costs Harrythecat
  • Score: 0
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