'Probe needed' into IT meltdown

'Probe needed' into IT meltdown

NatWest opened 1,200 branches on Sunday for the first time ever as it dealt with a massive backlog of payments caused by a computer glitch

NatWest opened 1,200 branches on Sunday for the first time ever as it dealt with a massive backlog of payments caused by a computer glitch

First published in National News © by

Bank bosses should be subject to a "detailed investigation" over the IT meltdown which left thousands of customers without access to cash, Bank of England governor Sir Mervyn King has said.

His comments came as Royal Bank of Scotland said it was finally getting on top of the crisis after it successfully updated all but 1% of NatWest and RBS account balances overnight.

RBS Group has had less success sorting out the delays experienced by Ulster Bank customers, but it hopes to restore a full service for the start of next week.

Sir Mervyn told MPs there would need to be a "detailed investigation" into what went wrong and why it has taken so long to sort the issues out.

RBS and NatWest have around 15 million accounts between them, but it is still unclear how many were affected by the disruption.

A spokesman for RBS Group said it may "never know" the exact figure as it was not possible to tell when everyone is expecting money to be paid into their account and some people may not have noticed problems.

Ulster Bank has estimated that about 100,000 of its customers have been caught up in the problems, which have meant that customers' balances have not been updating properly and their wages have not shown up in their accounts, although the money is "in the system".

The Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS) warned that it could be weeks before customers see all of the issues completely resolved.

The banking group has extended its opening hours this week as staff work "round the clock" to sort out the problems, which began after a software update last Tuesday. People have had their house moves and holidays disrupted and a defendant in a court case had to spend the weekend in prison because the RBS computer failure prevented his bail money being transferred.

In a hearing with the Treasury Select Committee, Sir Mervyn said the Bank had been in close contact with management at RBS since the problem arose, and over the weekend. He said the issues were technical and not a reflection of funding issues at the bank, which is 80% state-owned.

Comments

Post a comment

Remember you are personally responsible for what you post on this site and must abide by our site terms. Do not post anything that is false, abusive or malicious. If you wish to complain, please use the ‘report this post’ link.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree