One in three Pembrokeshire benefit claimants fit for work, says DWP

More than a third of Pembrokeshire people on the old incapacity benefits have been found to be capable of some form of work, following reassessment for the new employment and support allowance.

New data from the Department for Work and Pensions has outlined that 470 of those reassessed (35%) in the county have been deemed fit for some kind of work.

The data shows a total caseload of 1470 cases, with 110 of those still in progress or closed before assessment took place.

Of the 65% who were entitled to the new allowance, 40% of those were put in the 'work related activity group', meaning they are currently too ill or disabled to work and entitled to the benefit, but will be expected to take steps towards an eventual return to work when they are able.

The other 25% have been put into the support group, where they get unconditional support as they are too ill or disabled to work.

Those who have been found fit to work will receive support from JobCentre Plus and the work programme, which offers support over two years for people who are furthest away from the jobs market and who need the most help to eventually move into work.

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11:20pm Sat 9 Feb 13

Tttoommy says...

my neighbour is classed as disabled, she earns about £10k more than I do - the sole salary in our house where I get nothing and have to pay for all my wifes and kids expenses - don't get me wrong - proud I support them , her husband drives a bus so another pay check in the house BUT she also gets an all expenses paid car - what annoys me is not that she even crosses the bridge over the haven free or she gets tyres and insurance thrown in BUT she complains that SHE has to pay for the petrol when she takes the car to Carmarthen to get it serviced (again for free)
my neighbour is classed as disabled, she earns about £10k more than I do - the sole salary in our house where I get nothing and have to pay for all my wifes and kids expenses - don't get me wrong - proud I support them , her husband drives a bus so another pay check in the house BUT she also gets an all expenses paid car - what annoys me is not that she even crosses the bridge over the haven free or she gets tyres and insurance thrown in BUT she complains that SHE has to pay for the petrol when she takes the car to Carmarthen to get it serviced (again for free) Tttoommy
  • Score: 0

11:24pm Sat 9 Feb 13

Tttoommy says...

Cannot edit the above but forgot to mention she is SO mean AND she assumes that as she's "disabled" she should be able to retire at 55/57(?) without any hassle and get a full pension despite not paying much in either to the state or to a private pension - my point I guess is - don't expect the state to help
Cannot edit the above but forgot to mention she is SO mean AND she assumes that as she's "disabled" she should be able to retire at 55/57(?) without any hassle and get a full pension despite not paying much in either to the state or to a private pension - my point I guess is - don't expect the state to help Tttoommy
  • Score: 0

7:23am Sun 10 Feb 13

Tina2 says...

So how much benefit does she actually get then?
So how much benefit does she actually get then? Tina2
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10:14am Sun 10 Feb 13

enthusiasticmisfit says...

I would like to comment on tttoomy's post that disability benefits are given due to the extra costs associated with being disabled- needing care, not being able to take public transport, needing adaptations, etc. If you neighbour is working then she will be paying tax, N.I contributions, pension contributions, etc. Being disabled also doesn't give her any entitlement to retire early- could she be winding you up? :)
I would like to comment on tttoomy's post that disability benefits are given due to the extra costs associated with being disabled- needing care, not being able to take public transport, needing adaptations, etc. If you neighbour is working then she will be paying tax, N.I contributions, pension contributions, etc. Being disabled also doesn't give her any entitlement to retire early- could she be winding you up? :) enthusiasticmisfit
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5:54pm Mon 11 Feb 13

Tina2 says...

enthusiasticmisfit wrote:
I would like to comment on tttoomy's post that disability benefits are given due to the extra costs associated with being disabled- needing care, not being able to take public transport, needing adaptations, etc. If you neighbour is working then she will be paying tax, N.I contributions, pension contributions, etc. Being disabled also doesn't give her any entitlement to retire early- could she be winding you up? :)
You are right there:)
[quote][p][bold]enthusiasticmisfit[/bold] wrote: I would like to comment on tttoomy's post that disability benefits are given due to the extra costs associated with being disabled- needing care, not being able to take public transport, needing adaptations, etc. If you neighbour is working then she will be paying tax, N.I contributions, pension contributions, etc. Being disabled also doesn't give her any entitlement to retire early- could she be winding you up? :)[/p][/quote]You are right there:) Tina2
  • Score: 0

5:53pm Tue 12 Feb 13

Tttoommy says...

Tina2 wrote:
enthusiasticmisfit wrote:
I would like to comment on tttoomy's post that disability benefits are given due to the extra costs associated with being disabled- needing care, not being able to take public transport, needing adaptations, etc. If you neighbour is working then she will be paying tax, N.I contributions, pension contributions, etc. Being disabled also doesn't give her any entitlement to retire early- could she be winding you up? :)
You are right there:)
She works for the "state" in its widest meaning
She's been "on the sick" for 5 months so far on full pay when she has taken about 6 short breaks to Spain for between 1 and 2 weeks each time (I grant you with a budget airline)
She has a tame GP who when told that she would like to retire early just gave her a sick note for several months - her plans are to get early retirement due to her sickness - then she'll set up her own business
[quote][p][bold]Tina2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]enthusiasticmisfit[/bold] wrote: I would like to comment on tttoomy's post that disability benefits are given due to the extra costs associated with being disabled- needing care, not being able to take public transport, needing adaptations, etc. If you neighbour is working then she will be paying tax, N.I contributions, pension contributions, etc. Being disabled also doesn't give her any entitlement to retire early- could she be winding you up? :)[/p][/quote]You are right there:)[/p][/quote]She works for the "state" in its widest meaning She's been "on the sick" for 5 months so far on full pay when she has taken about 6 short breaks to Spain for between 1 and 2 weeks each time (I grant you with a budget airline) She has a tame GP who when told that she would like to retire early just gave her a sick note for several months - her plans are to get early retirement due to her sickness - then she'll set up her own business Tttoommy
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7:39pm Wed 13 Feb 13

Yves14.. says...

Tttoommy. She sounds like she is wacking the system for all it is worth!

Mobility Allowance offers the recipient either a low rate or higher rate the latter entitles a free car and service the vehicle is changed every three years or so.

More people are entitled to financial support than claimants in the United Kingdom.
Others, more savvy, milk the benefit system purposely guess that is why it is in the mess it is in.
Tttoommy. She sounds like she is wacking the system for all it is worth! Mobility Allowance offers the recipient either a low rate or higher rate the latter entitles a free car and service the vehicle is changed every three years or so. More people are entitled to financial support than claimants in the United Kingdom. Others, more savvy, milk the benefit system purposely guess that is why it is in the mess it is in. Yves14..
  • Score: 0

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